Charlotte Barnes

The last, but certainly not least of our authors this month, Charlotte Barnes share news of her latest books.

When did you start writing, and why?

It feels a bit fanciful to say it, but I feel like I’ve always written. Mum takes great pleasure in rolling out books that were stapled together by yours truly – written and illustrated by my own fair hand too. I remember always loving the telling; to be gifted the experience of hearing a good story. I think that created a real drive in me from quite a young age. I wanted to give something similar to people. I’ve no idea whether I’ve reached that point yet or not, but either way I still feel that drive, to create the feelings, the entertainment, to give people something to take away. Granted, young-Charley wasn’t as big on crime fiction as adult-Charley, but tastes change!

Which do you like to write, series or standalones?  If you write both, what do you find the difference?

I have written both and I’ve loved writing both, so this is a great question! For the series – that is, The Copycat, The Watcher, and The Cutter – I think I created some real ties with those characters, because I came back to them so often. I was invested in what was happening to them, around them, even what might have happened to them off-screen – or rather, in the time between books. Whereas, with a standalone, my works in that area have been, at least to me, much more grizzly. Rather than juggling many characters and caring about them all equally, standalones (especially when they’re written as first-person voices) require a real mental investment to make sure you get the character just so, and that you can hold them that way for the length of your book.

Is there anything you wouldn’t write about?

Not much, but certainly some things. I find it very difficult to read fiction – well, crime fiction, that is – that deals with children, anything below the age of around thirteen. It’s always been a troublesome area for me to navigate as a reader and, because of that, I’m not even sure I could attempt writing about it without pushing my boundaries a little too far. I’ll stick to the other crimes!

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

Gillian – and I have to say that because she scares even me! Gillian is the narrative voice in Intention, which is the first psychological thriller I had published with Bloodhound Books. She steers the first novel that I’ve ever really carried through to its end. She’s vicious, unknowingly so, and curious in terrifying ways, and to this day I’m exceptionally proud of things she does, and ways she behaves, in that novel.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

There is a pesky journalist who crops up for the first time in The Copycat; Heather, her name is. I originally introduced her to be a bit of a pain during an interview, which she was. But then the DI Watton series continued, into The Watcher and The Cutter, and despite my dislike of her I did always find a place for her – to add a bit of drama, I think! Although she always pokes holes in my other characters.

Tell us about your last book…

The Watcher is the middle DI Melanie Watton novel, but it can easily be read as a standalone piece too. A video surfaces in the local area that looks to show a man being murdered. Watton and her team first have to verify the video is what it looks like, then they have to hunt a killer without having a murder, a crime scene, or even a victim.
But when other snuff films start to surface, it becomes clear the killer is more experienced than anyone first thought…

What’s coming next…

The Cutter is the third and final DI Melanie Watton novel, coming on March 15th. In this final book, things get personal. A taxidermist is murdered and his studio robbed of various structures and projects. But soon these stolen items start to appear at other crime scenes – with messages attached.
The team knows that one of them is being targeted. But the who and the why are yet to be discovered…

Anything else you want to share?

The Cutter is one of three novels that I have coming out with Bloodhound Books this year. The other two, though, are standalone psychological thrillers, which I’m very excited about! All I See Is You will arrive in May 2021 and Sincerely, Yours will arrive in September.


Photo credit:
Marcus Mingins



Charlotte ‘Charley’ Barnes is an author and academic from the West Midlands, UK. She is a Lecturer at the University of Wolverhampton, where she teaches Creative and Professional Writing, and she is also the Director of Sabotage Reviews and the Editor of Dear Reader. Charley writes crime under the name of Charlotte, but also publishes poetry as Charley Barnes.



Thanks Charlotte, lovely to hear from you and best of luck with everything

Well folks, that’s it from the February Blog Run, 28 excellent authors sharing their stories with us. Thanks to each and every one of them and to you for reading.

Alison Layland

Alison Layland, another Crime Cymru author talks to us about her novels, skills with foreign languages and upcoming events to watch out for.

When did you start writing, and why?

I’ve always told myself stories, including a couple of long-running soap operas, and I recently came across a treasure trove of childhood poems and songs. However, I only began to realise that I could actually be a writer when we moved to Wales, I took to learning the language, and our Welsh classes continued in the form of creative writing sessions. I found that writing in a language that wasn’t my mother tongue somehow broke down inhibitions and opened doors. I was thrilled when my Welsh short stories won Eisteddfod prizes, and I had a number of Welsh flash fiction pieces published. Since my first published novel, however, I’ve written mainly in English, my native language, and mainly novels, though I’d love to return to short stories and flash fiction as well.

What motivates you to write?

I love telling stories. There’s nothing more fulfilling than developing characters and then spending time with them, along with the satisfaction of a plot unfolding and loose ends coming together. From that, it’s probably obvious that I’m a character-led “pantser” when it comes to first drafts; meticulous planning takes over in subsequent drafts, however, and I enjoy both stages equally.

I’m also keen to explore a variety of issues in my fiction, and love the research that involves. In my first novel, Someone Else’s Conflict, the central issue, and springboard for the story, was the long-lasting effects of war – a fictional atrocity during the 1990s Croatian War of Independence – on two of my characters. I did a lot of research for the Croatian part of the story, including historical reading, travel and even learning the language to deepen my feel for the culture.

My second novel, Riverflow, was initially motivated by a desire to draw attention to environmental issues. As the story unfolded, I found myself drawn into my characters’ relationships and the effects of external events on my protagonists’ marriage.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones? 

My two published novels are standalone psychological mysteries. However, having spent months or years invested in my characters and their worlds, it’s tempting to revisit (on paper as well as in my mind!) and I’m attracted to the idea of a series. I’m not sure if it counts, but my work-in-progress is set in the future, and it refers back to some of the characters in Riverflow.



Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

One of the things I most like about fiction, both writing and reading, is that you can get close to characters you’d probably run a mile from in real life. A classic example is Bede, the protagonist in Riverflow. As I would in real life, I admire and respect his ideals, but he’s a really prickly character who would be difficult to know in real life – but the reasons for this are revealed in the novel. I know several readers feel ambivalent towards him and, as I do, sympathise with his long-suffering wife, Elin, but think of him as a difficult but ultimately sympathetic character.

All in all, however, my favourite character is itinerant busker and storyteller Jay Spinney, from my debut, Someone Else’s Conflict. Although he has a dark past and a reluctance to be open and honest, he is ultimately compelled to do the right thing, and several readers have fallen under his spell.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

Although I try to see the nuances of all my characters and understand their motivations, some are nevertheless distinctly unlikeable. Mihal Novak, a small-time gangster in Someone Else’s Conflict is one of them, and in Riverflow it’s arrogant landowner Philip Northcote. Although he’s a true antagonist, I drew on aspects of a couple of people in real life when creating the character, so who knows, there may be some who relate to him more than I do!

Tell us about your last book…

Inspired by my own environmental activism, my second psychological mystery, Riverflow, was published in 2019, and chosen as a Waterstones Book of the Month.

“In a village in the Welsh Marches, the undercurrents are as dark and strong as the River Severn. After a beloved family member is drowned in a devastating flood, Bede and Elin Sherwell only want to pick up the pieces and pursue their off-grid life in peace. But when a local landowner applies to start fracking near their smallholding, they are drawn in to the frontline of the protests. Mysterious threats and incidents begin to destroy trust, rake up the past and threaten their future together. Who is trying to ruin their world and how far will they go?”

What’s coming next…

I’m working on a novel set in the mid-21st century, about a community of people who have chosen to live an island life apart from a troubled society. As well as some intricate character relations and intrigues, I’m also really enjoying developing a vision of what the world might be like in three decades’ time…

Anything else you want to share?

I’m proud to be associated with Gŵyl Crime Cymru Festival, the first international crime festival in Wales, for which I’m helping to organise a special competition. We’ll be holding a digital festival on 26 April-3 May 2021 and our inaugural in-person festival in Aberystwyth on 29 April-2 May 2022. Watch this space!




Alison Layland is a freelance writer and translator who lives and works in the Welsh borderlands. She is the author of two psychological mysteries, Someone Else’s Conflict and Riverflow, both published by Honno Press, and has also translated a number of best-selling novels.


You can find out more on her website at www.alayland.uk and her Alison Layland (Amazon Author Page), and follow her on Twitter @AlisonLayland


Thank you Alison, Wales is quite a seductive place to live, and I envy your skill with foreign languages.

Tomorrow and last up is writer Charlotte Barnes

Mark Hill

Today Mark Hill talks to us offering some odd insights into secondary characters and bay leaves and mixed up tenses.

What motivates you to write?

I am literally useless at everything else. Some people will suggest that I’m not that much good at writing novels either, but at least I enjoy doing it… most of the time. Sometimes – at least twice a week – it drives me over the edge with frustration and anger. I’ll cry and sob and howl, and vow never to write another word. But then I’ll remember that I’m totally useless at everything else, so I may as well get on with it.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones?  If you write both, what do you find the difference?

I have two detective series. Two books feature my unstable North London copper Ray Drake; two are about the altogether lovely and very stable Sasha Dawson, and those are set in Southend.

I’ve just started my first standalone, a psychological thriller. In One Bad Thing my protagonist Hannah discovers that the past has a terrible way of coming back to haunt you.

It’s been a fascinating and challenging experience, and I’ve made a conscious effort to make it as different from my series books as possible. It’s kind of intense, because I’m also writing in first person present tense, so the reader is locked very firmly into Hannah’s head. Sometimes my tenses will get confused, and then I’ll get confused, and I’ll have to go for a nap.

Is there anything you wouldn’t write about?

I’ve written books which have managed to touch on very dark and serious subjects, such as institutional abuse, but I’ve managed to hint at those things rather than tackle them head on. I wouldn’t write about animal cruelty, I’m ambivalent about catalytic converters, and I will never, ever tackle the thorny issue of what exactly a bay leaf adds to a meal, taste-wise.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

I don’t have least-favourite characters, because they’re all fantastic and compelling, and it feels unkind to even consider singling out any of them. I tell you which characters it can be hard to write, though. It’s those walk-on characters who pop up as witnesses to a crime. My detectives will often spend a scene interviewing them, and then they’ll head off-page and we’ll never hear from them again.

I think all those minor walk-on characters deserve to be written just as well as the main characters. There’s so little space to give them a chance to shine, but it’s worth putting the effort in. In my book It Was Her there’s a chapter featuring two old gay gentlemen, Douglas and Bailey, who recount to the police a home-invasion they were victims of. Douglas has dementia and mistakes one of the intruders for his dead wife. Douglas and Bailey only appear in one chapter, but I think it’s one of the best I’ve ever written.



Tell us about your last book…

The latest Sasha Dawson book, The Woman In The Wood, is out on March 4th, and it features a former Essex reality star who finds himself in a world of trouble when his mates are targeted by a killer. Abs may not be the sharpest knife in the drawer, but he’s is a lovely guy. Trouble is, he’s got a dark secret, and as we all know, dark secrets never stayed buried.



 

What’s coming next… 

Psych thriller One Bad Thing is out early next year. Did I mention I keep getting the tenses mixed up? Don’t worry, I’ll have that sorted by the time it’s published, I’m sure I will…





A former radio producer, Mark Hill is the author of four novels. His First Lie and It Was Her are written as Mark Hill and The Bad Place and The Woman In The Wood as MK Hill. He still occasionally gets his tenses mixed-up.




Thank you for joining us, and I agree, secondary characters can be tough – but not always as tough as the tense!

Tomorrow we get to hear from Alison Layland.

Tina Baker

Tina Baker joins us to share her fear of going under, cat ownership and new release, Call Me Mummy

When did you start writing, and why?

I remember writing when I was very small. I could write by the time I started school when I was five. The first word I spelled myself was my aunty Zita’s name – a process of putting letters together and pestering my dad, ‘Does this spell anything?’ over and over.

I wrote poems at school and kept them secret, so it didn’t result in one of the many fights I had – living in a caravan I was branded a ‘gyppo’.
I wrote short stories at school. I told no one.

I always wrote bits and bobs but didn’t have much time as a journalist to write ‘my own stuff.’ Only after I stopped doing that did I have the brain space to write a novel.

What motivates you to write?

Fear. Pure and simple. Terror. Feeling I’ll go under if I don’t write. Even when I’m not putting the words on the page, I’m thinking about writing or feeling guilty (in bed) that I’m not writing. Or reading and thinking about my own writing.

What do you like to do to relax when not writing?

I last relaxed in 1978 and I’m pretty sure drugs were involved. I now don’t do drink or drugs. In the past, I sometimes relaxed in that rare point between drink 1 and 2. By drink 23 I wasn’t relaxed any more but dancing on tables and marauding around streets!

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

In Call Me Mummy I empathise with both Mummy and Kim – the woman who steals a child and the woman who loses her child. But I love Tonya – the child – the most. She’s a real fighter. And funny. She’s the daughter I never had.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

I’m currently working on book three and the lead character in that is terrifying! I can’t say more than that right now.

Tell us about your latest book…

Call me Mummy is my first book. It’s terrifying having it out in the world. (25th Feb)

Dame Lorraine Kelly said it’s ‘dark, heart breaking and totally absorbing.’
It’s about a woman desperate for a child – so much so, when she sees a child being neglected by her mother, she steals it. It’s also the story of the mother who loses that child – one branded a ‘scummy mummy’ by the media and social media trolls.

What’s coming next… 

Nasty Little Cuts is my second Viper Books novel – another psychological thriller out early 2022. It explores those small niggles, resentments and cruelties that build and build within relationships, and then in highly charged situations like Christmas can erupt into something horrific. Bridget Jones meets Jack Reacher.

Anything else you want to share?

The cats’ vet bills.





Tina was brought up in a caravan after her mother, a fairground traveller, fell pregnant by a window cleaner. She worked as a journalist/ broadcaster for thirty years, probably best known as a television critic for the BBC/ GMTV. After hours watching soaps gave her a widescreen bum, she lost weight and won Celebrity Fit Club. When not writing she works as a fitness instructor and rescues cats. Call Me Mummy is Tina’s first novel, inspired by her own unsuccessful attempts to have a child. Despite the grief of that, she hasn’t stolen one. So far.






Tina, thank you for being so honest, and entertaining, and making me laugh (mostly because of the I’ve-been-there syndrome).  Hope that the new release works out well for you.

Mark Hill is up tomorrow

Chris Curran

Today we are meeting Chris Curran and Abbie Frost, talking about her books.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones? 

I write standalones, probably because my first loves in crime fiction were standalones. Rebecca and My Cousin Rachel by the wonderful Daphne Du Maurier, Mary Stewart’s romantic thrillers and the sinister fiction of Patricia Highsmith. Even with writers like Ruth Rendell I preferred her standalones, like A Dark Adapted Eye (often written as Barbara Vine), rather than the Inspector Wexfords.

Later of course I came to appreciate the joys of a series. There’s something enormously satisfying about following a detective, professional or amateur, through a series of books. In effect you get two stories for the price of one: the immediate crime the sleuth is tasked with solving and the ongoing saga of their own complex, and often troubled, life.

However, so far, I’ve stuck with writing standalones. I did have a major police character, a family liaison officer called Loretta, in my third novel, Her Deadly Secret, and she proved so popular with readers I have considered featuring her in a series – we’ll see.

The special thing about standalones is that the reader can’t rely on anything. Even the narrator could be a killer (and I love an unreliable narrator!). Above all no character is safe, which adds an extra frisson to the whole thing.

Is there anything you wouldn’t write about?

I was asked this on a panel with two other crime writers recently and they both said they would never harm an animal in their books. Well, at the risk of alienating readers, I did actually kill a stray cat in one of my novels – a book where several people also die. The cat’s death was comparatively gentle and the animal didn’t really suffer. But, while no one seemed to have any sympathy for the humans, a couple of reviewers were outraged, not only that I let the cat die, but also that I hadn’t shown anyone feeding it!
Death and violence are givens in crime fiction and, as I said, no character is safe in my novels. So there’s probably not much I wouldn’t mention if it happens in real life. I do draw the line at graphic descriptions of violence, death or torture. I can’t bear to read that kind of thing myself and couldn’t face writing it.

What do you like to do to relax when not writing?

When we’re not under restrictions I love to go out for drinks and meals with friends and family. At the moment I have to settle for long walks with my husband. We live by the sea and there are lots of lovely places close by, so that is a real blessing.

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

I have to cheat here and mention two because there is one relatively minor character who gave me so much pleasure as he developed. He is Bill from my second novel, Her Turn to Cry. The book is set in the 1960s and Bill started as just a scary gangster threatening my main characters. As I wrote however something magical happened and he became more and more complex and human. In the end he turned out to be utterly pivotal to the resolution of the story, which was totally unplanned.

But the character I absolutely love, and the one many readers have really taken to, has to be Joe from my third Chris Curran novel, Her Deadly Secret. Although I never base my characters on real people, Joe has a lot in common with my husband. That didn’t stop me putting him through some awful traumas!


Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

In my Chris Curran books my villains would never think of themselves as baddies and are certainly not serial killer type psychopaths. They’ve often killed someone (or even more than one person) almost by accident – at least in their own minds! And readers not infrequently tell me they feel sympathy for them. This certainly happened with the murderer in my most recent Chris Curran novel, All the Little Lies. Several people have told me they were really upset when they found out whodunnit. And I have to say I felt the same!

However, I think the villain in my latest book, The Guesthouse, which is published under the name Abbie Frost, is as evil as they come and has few redeeming features.

Tell us about your last book…

The Guesthouse is a dark and gothic take on the country house murder mystery. The title refers to a remote mansion, on the coast of County Mayo in Ireland, that has been turned into a B&B. Hannah visits the place when she is trying to recover from the death of her boyfriend. Along with the other guests she soon discovers that they all have some connection to the house itself – and that they are unlikely to leave alive.

What’s coming next…

I don’t want to say too much about the book I’m editing at the moment, but it is a Chris Curran title. It’s about a young actress who joins a theatre group in the depths of the Gloucestershire countryside. They are plagued by a series of practical jokes that become progressively more dangerous.
And I’ve just started what I hope will be the next Abbie Frost. It’s set in an abandoned holiday camp on the coast not far from where I live. And it’s seriously creepy!



Chris Curran/Abbie Frost was born in London, but has lived in Hastings for more than twenty years. She has worked, amongst other things, as a teacher, a lecturer, an editor and an actor.

As Chris Curran she has written five psychological suspense novels for Harper Collins. Chris is lover of gothic fiction. So, for her most recent book, she decided to try something even darker than usual. This turned out to be The Guesthouse, which was published under the name Abbie Frost.

Follow Chris/Abbie on Twitter: @FrostyAbbie
Website:  https://chriscurranauthor.com/
https://www.instagram.com/chriscurranwriter

Thank for taking the time to talk to us, and best of luck with The Guesthouse and all future releases.

Tomorrow we’re talking to Tina Baker.

Victoria Dowd

Today Victoria Dowd shares with us her love of the Golden Age, gardening and a Guide to Murder

When did you start writing, and why?

I’ve been writing since I was a young girl. I used to love making up stories and poems. I read a lot and dreamed of being a writer. It was just so fantastic to me that all these wonderful worlds existed, and I could create anywhere or anyone I wanted. I worked as a criminal defence barrister for many years but continued to write short fiction, which I started to get published in various magazines and journals. This then led into me taking the leap into writing full length novels. When I won the Gothic Fiction prize, I started to believe I really could be a full-time writer.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones?  If you write both, what do you find the difference?

I love writing series as you have room to really develop the characters over a number of books and there’s room to explore different aspects of them that a single novel wouldn’t allow for. It’s so exciting to start a new book and come back to the characters that are already there and I know so well. My crime series follows the Smart women who I absolutely love writing and with each new novel I get the chance to revisit them and expand who they are. I’ve just finished writing book three and it’s always a little bitter-sweet when I have to put them away for a while. I can’t imagine not being able to write about them again!

What do you like to do to relax when not writing?

Like most writers, I read a lot. I’m a huge fan of Golden Age Detective fiction and recently that’s had a huge resurgence so there’s plenty of books out there which is wonderful. I also love watching all the Agatha Christie adaptations which has recently gone from being a bit of a hobby to being asked to speak at various Agatha Christie festivals about adaptations. I write a series of articles called Adapting Agatha which are on my blog. I’m also a very keen gardener. It gives me a lot of opportunity just to think or completely empty my mind! I like sea swimming as well, for similar reasons.

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

This is a hard question. I love all my main characters as they are the backbone of the series. Ursula is sharp but quite fragile in many ways; Pandora, her mother, is a very complex, difficult woman but she has as lot of layers which I like unfolding; and Aunt Charlotte is wonderfully surreal. Their characters feed off one another. We only really get to know them through their interactions with one another. But if I was absolutely forced to choose one of them, it would have to be Ursula. She’s the narrator of all the books in the series so it really is all through her lens, in her words. What I love about writing her though, is that she is a very unreliable narrator. This isn’t helped by the fact that she drinks a little too much brandy which she carries around in a hipflask secreted in a cut out section of her father’s Bible. She misses things, she perceives them in a pretty warped way sometimes so she’s a fantastic tool for misdirection. The reader trusts her, when really they shouldn’t. She often leads them down the wrong path. She’s very bright and can be quite capable at times but then she sometimes struggles with even the most basic aspects of life. A lot of this stems from her inability to deal with grief at the loss of her father many years ago. Her response to death is one of my favourite parts of her, and in fact, the books as a whole. Murder mysteries don’t often deal with the actual impact of death. Whereas with Ursula, I can put this issue of grief and loss right at the heart of the books.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

This is slightly easier. Joy Cowdale in book 1 – The Smart Woman’s Guide to Murder. She’s known by Ursula as Less, which is a shortening of Joyless. She’s the kind of annoying, self-indulgent person who talks a lot about themselves and their needs. She was actually great fun to write as I could put in all those irritating traits that I find so annoying. Unfortunately, at times I would actually find myself becoming increasing annoyed at her though.

Tell us about your last book…

My last book was The Smart Woman’s Guide to Murder. It came out in May 2020 and is the first book in the Smart woman’s series. It’s also my debut crime novel. It’s a classic whodunnit updated with lots of dark humour. When a book club are snowed in at an isolated country house, the murders begin. The relationships between mother, daughter and sister are fraught from the beginning but to survive they have to try and put their differences aside. It’s been an absolutely wonderful experience having this first book published and I’ve been lucky enough to have it on a few Best Books of 2020 lists. It’s also been announced as a finalist in the People’s Book Prize which is really lovely as it’s a people’s choice award where anyone can vote.

What’s coming next…

Book 2 in the series – Body on the Island – is coming out on 23rd February. I’m really excited about this one as it follows the characters who survive the first book. They decide they actually weren’t very good at surviving so embark on a Bear Grylls’ style survival course and end up on an uninhabited island when the murders begin. It’s a little bit darker than the first one but with lots of opportunity for comedy as well. They’re not really the best characters to find themselves on a survival course! I had a lot of fun writing this one. There was also scope with this book to open up the more supernatural elements of the book that were hinted at in the first one. It’s quite a scary environment they find themselves in with lots of old folk tales and legends. These were fantastic to research.


Anything else you want to share?

Here’s the link to my book https://geni.us/smartwomanvictoria

I’ll be speaking at various festivals this year about Agatha Christie. If you’d like to read my Adapting Agatha series, here’s the link Adapting Agatha – Victoria Dowd

If you want to vote in the People’s Book Prize this is the link. THE SMART WOMAN’S GUIDE TO MURDER | Peoples Book Prize




Victoria is the author of The Smart Woman’s Guide to Murder and the follow up book, Body on the Island. They are a dark comic take on the classic whodunnit.

She is also an award winning short story writer, winning the Gothic Fiction prize. She was runner up in The New Writer’s writer of the year award and her work has been short listed by Writers’ Forum magazine. She was also long-listed for The Willesden Herald International Short Story Competition. Her work has been published in various magazines.

After studying at Cambridge, she was a barrister for many years.


Thanks Victoria, I’m looking forward to reading the Guide, and best of luck with Body on the Island.

Tomorrow, we’re with Chris Curran

Evonne Wareham

Today Evonne Wareham talks about the compulsion to write, the Riviera and the thriller in romance.

When did you start writing, and why?

The compulsion to write seems to be in the DNA. I’ve made up and written stories for as long as I can remember. I always hoped to be a published author one day, but it took me a very long time to arrive at the genre that I wanted to commit to, which is romantic suspense AKA romantic thrillers. It’s a genre better known in the US than the UK. Basically it’s what it says on the tin – a romance and thriller combined. I like writing romance – I’ve been a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association for many years and experimented with many genres in that time, as part of their scheme to encourage new writers. What I wrote always seemed to have a crime in it and although I like the story to have a positive outcome – alright, yes, a happy ending – I also like a healthy dose of mayhem. When I discovered the romantic suspense genre, by way of the American novelist Nora Roberts, something clicked. Could I write that kind of book and set it in British/European locations rather than in the US? The answer was that yes, I could – so now I write romances with a higher body count than you might usually expect. I consider what I write to be entertainment and escapism, even if it is a crime story. Crime writing is an amazingly popular genre, read for recreation. We will happily read (and write) about things that we would never want to experience in real life. With my books you get a love story as well. In addition to a twisty plot a key ingredient for me is the emotional development of the relationship between hero and heroine. I have to say that throwing my protagonists into a succession of scary situations is a very good way of getting them on the fast track to falling for each other. And yes, there are love scenes.

Is there anything you wouldn’t write about?

I’m not afraid of a high body count, and people meet nasty ends, and not always the bad guys, but I don’t go for extremely graphic descriptions – you won’t find any scenes on the autopsy table. I’m also careful about the situations I put my heroines into. They might be frightening scenarios but I try not to make them victims – they are strong women in unusually challenging circumstances – not damsels in distress, but damsels who might need the help of the hero to sort out the mess I have dumped them both into.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones?  If you write both, what do you find the difference?

I’ve done both, and I hope to continue that way. I have standalones that are at the grittier end of romantic suspense and I’m currently writing a series that is much lighter – high jinks in various locations on the French and Italian Riviera. Those are loosely based around personnel connected with a detective agency in Bath, with a new central couple/love story for each book and some overlapping characters. They are much frothier, heavier on the romance – and great fun to write. I think of them in terms of those 1950s films with glamorous people zipping about in fast cars in sunny locations. One of the things I like about writing those is the chance to interchange characters, with cameo appearances, and minor characters promoted to central stage. It’s fun when writing to find unexpected places where someone from a previous book can pop up because they have special expertise that I need. 

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

This is difficult because I always fall for my heroes and admire my heroines – if you’re spending a lot of time with them, you have to enjoy it. If pushed, I would probably cite Cassie and Jake, the couple from my first Riviera book – Summer in San Remo. That book is not one for die hard crime fans. It’s the lightest I’ve written, no dead bodies and the crime element is very low key – it’s much more about the romance. Jake dumped Cassie twelve years ago, and she hasn’t forgiven him. The interaction between them jumped off the page at me, and they have continued to do that when they make guest appearances later in the series. That book was meant to be a one-off romp-on-the-Riviera holiday read, but I enjoyed writing it so much that it became the first of a series. Now my dark side is slowly surfacing and the crime element is sneaking up the scale. I was delighted when my editor agreed that I could kill off a couple of people in the second one.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

I’ll take this as nastiest character, rather than least favourite, as I have to feel a connection to all the people I write about and I love writing villains. Nastiest would probably be Luce – the villain from Never Coming Home, which was my first published book. It’s a standalone from the grittier end of the spectrum, with a double plot – the heroines’ missing child and something dangerous from the hero’s past that has suddenly resurfaced. Luce is a hired killer who enjoys his work and he has a score to settle with Devlin, the hero. There’s a trail of bodies and some collateral damage in that one. It’s always disturbing to wonder exactly where in my subconscious he came from.


Tell us about your last book…          

The latest book is A Wedding on the Riviera, the second in the Riviera series. It’s my version of those films and TV series with gangs of professional hustlers. This one has a group of friends taking on a con man who is running a scam which leaves a trail of broken-hearted brides at the altar. They set up a counter con, with a fake prospective bride. Of course there is also a hot romance and it ends with a spectacularly OTT wedding …

What’s coming next…

I’m currently at work on Riviera 3 – this one is set in Portofino on the Italian Riviera and starts with an unexpected and slightly mysterious inheritance. I’m hoping that it will be out later this summer. I have a fourth circling in a holding pattern – it’s at the plotting/research stage – Egyptology, stolen artifacts and a showdown in Monte Carlo. I’m really hoping I get to research that last bit in person, instead of relying on memory, the Internet and guide books. After that I want to go back to the grittier stories – I have a few of them pushing at the door, clamouring to be let out.

Anything else you want to share?

Two of my standalones – Out of Sight Out of Mind and What Happens at Christmas have a chunk of the action set in the Welsh National Parks – Pembrokeshire and the Brecon Beacons. I want to set more stories in my native Wales to use both the romantic and dramatic possibilities of the landscape. It might be time to give Snowdonia a turn, although I do have plans involving a fictionalized version of the South Wales coast where I live.

©Sian_Trenberth_Photography

Evonne is an award winning Welsh author of romantic suspense – more crime and dead bodies than your average romance.  Born and brought up in Barry, she is a Doctor of Philosophy and an historian, and a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, the Crime Writers’ Association, International Thriller Writers and Crime Cymru. Her first book, Never Coming Home, won the Romantic Novelists’ Association award for a best debut novel and also awards from chapters of the Romance Writers of America.
Twitter  https://twitter.com/evonnewareham
Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/evonnewarehamauthor/
Website  www.evonnewareham.com
Blog  www.evonneonwednesday.blogspot.com



Evonne, I am right there with you, my latest is a romantic thriller, love the genre! It’s where I positioned my last novel too.

Tomorrow we’ll be talking to Victoria Dowd.

Cathy Ace

Today the lovely Cathy Ace talks about her start in writing, her garden and the Cait Morgan series

When did you start writing, and why?

I was one of those children to whom their teacher says, ‘I asked for an essay, not a book!’, so I think I’ve always enjoyed writing. Indeed, I’ve been fortunate to have an entire career built on it in advertising, public relations, and training. My criminal side took a while to emerge; the first short story with a criminal bent I ever wrote was called ‘Dear George’. It was written in a car park in 1987, in about an hour and a half.

Why?

Well, I’d been waiting to collect my sister at Gatwick airport, and her flight was delayed. I bought a magazine (I’d forgotten to carry a book – what an admission!) and the one I chose had a headline: ‘Murder, and be published!’. A couple of months later, in the middle of my workday as a sales person for a label-printing company, I left the HQ of one of my clients (Marks & Spencer) on Baker Street in London, and sat in my car in the multi-storey car park writing my short story entry to the magazine’s competition on a notepad. Fast forward a few months, and I was somewhat taken aback when I received a letter to say the story – DEAR GEORGE – would, indeed, be published in an anthology called MURDER AND COMPANY, alongside stories by ‘real’ authors. I was pleased, excited a little, but I’d just remortgaged my flat to be able to set up my own business, so it was a bit of a frisson rather than a ‘this could change my life’ moment. The same short story was then (in 1990) included in another anthology called THRILLERS, which was created for the GCSE English Language syllabus…which blew me away. By the time I was approached by Martin Jarvis and Rosalind Ayres in 2007 asking if they could produce the story for BBC Radio 4, I had sold my business, migrated to Canada, and had written nine marketing textbooks, which had been published around the world. DEAR GEORGE was first broadcast on July 9th 2007 – my family in Swansea listened to it there, while I listened in Canada…it was a special moment. Sadly, my father died soon afterwards, and I decided that if I was going to write fiction I’d better get on with it. So I Indie-published a collection of short stories, then a collection of novellas, and my first novel (The Corpse With The Silver Tongue) was traditionally published in March 2012.

Is there anything you wouldn’t write about?

Extreme violence, torture, detailed forensics, graphic sexual interactions, military-type activities, action scenes or chases: I don’t think I’d be good at writing about any of these, though I do read them. All that being said, I reserve the right to write about the threat of any/all of them, or the psychological/after-effects of any/all of them.

What do you like to do to relax when not writing?

Since March 2020 I’ve put a fair amount of time and effort into redecorating the house…I dare say I am not alone in this! However, my real passion is gardening. Having five acres to look after means I’m gardening on a scale I couldn’t have imagined earlier in my life, but I love it. Our home is half-way up a little mountain in south-western British Columbia, so our climate is virtually the same as it would be if I lived at the top of Kilvey Hill, in Swansea. Over the past twenty years we’ve planted dozens of roses, hundreds of rhododendrons, hydrangea, and hibiscus (hardy varieties only), as well as many other flowering plants you’d see in any Welsh garden. We’ve also planted a couple of hundred Japanese maples, of many different varieties, as well as other deciduous ornamentals (we’re fortunate to already have a fabulous variety of mature evergreens, many of which are a couple of hundred feet tall). Though it’s hard work, I find it incredibly relaxing (well, okay then, I find the gardening hard, but the sitting in the hot tub with a beer afterwards incredibly relaxing!). 

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

Whomever I am writing about at the time – and that happens to be Cait Morgan. I’m currently writing the tenth book in Cait Morgan Mysteries series; they’re all written in the first person, from the point of view of Cait Morgan who (like me) was born and raised in Swansea, went to Cardiff University but then (unlike me) went on to Cambridge to gain her Masters degree in criminal psychology. She’s transferred to the University of Vancouver (based on a synthesis of two universities in the area where I taught upon my own arrival in Canada) where she’s now a professor, specializing in research into victim profiling. She’s been to the same schools as me, enjoys the same food and drink that I do (and, trust me, if she eats or drinks something in a book, I have thoroughly researched said victuals myself!) and is short and overweight, like me. She has habits and abilities, however – and a dark background – that I do not personally possess, so she’s not ‘me’. But I like the way she’s bossy – but fragile, always right – until she’s wrong, and thinks quite snarky thoughts – but tries her best to edit her tongue. She first appeared in three short stories in Murder Keeps No Calendar, then in a novella in Murder Knows No Season, prior to these soon-to-be-ten novels (The Corpse With The Iron Will will be published in May 2021).  A strange thing is happening at the moment: I’m having conversations about who will play Cait Morgan in the television movies that are going to be made of the books (by Free@LastTV, who make the Agatha Raisin series) – since she’s so similar to me it’s a bit like trying to cast myself! And, no, we’re not considering Meryl Streep – she can play almost anything, but I really, really want a Welsh woman to play Cait!

Links:
http://www.cathyace.com/cait-morgan-mysteries
http://www.cathyace.com/long-short-stories

The Wrong Boy: Suspense-packed page turner...the ending is a stunner by [Cathy Ace]

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

To be honest, every book I’ve written contains characters I’d prefer not to break bread with, but I think the one I grew to hate the most as I was writing him was Bob Thistlewaite, the ex-husband of one of the three women of the Jones family who run a pub called The Dragon’s Head in the village of Rhosddraig, in The Wrong Boy. This is a book of suspense, and every character has their secrets, so it’s difficult for me to say too much about the character here, because folks might not have read the book yet, and his role in it is small, but critical. Suffice to say, he richly deserves what happens to him. By the way, The Wrong Boy has also been optioned for TV, to be broadcast as a three-part miniseries in both Welsh and English, so I’ll be very curious to see who they cast for this character.
http://www.cathyace.com/the-wrong-boy

Tell us about your last book…

The Corpse with the Crystal Skull (The Cait Morgan Mysteries Book 9) by [Cathy Ace]

The Corpse With The Crystal Skull was published in June 2020, and I’m delighted with how well it’s been received. There hadn’t been a new Cait Morgan mystery since 2017, so I was a bit nervous about the long break between books (I’d been contracted to write the third and fourth books in my WISE Enquiries Agency Mysteries, so Cait took a rest for a while) but I shouldn’t have worried, it seems. This ninth book in the series gave me a chance to take Cait and her husband Bud to Jamaica (each Cait Morgan Mystery is set in a different country) and I actually finished writing the book when I was in the Caribbean…in February and March 2020 when, as we all know now, the world was going to Hell in a handbasket! While editing the book, back in Canada in lockdown, I thoroughly enjoyed reliving the food, drink and HEAT I was missing (and still am). It led the Toronto Star to include this in its review, about me: ‘…more than adept at the Christie thing…’ and in The Jury Box (Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine) they said ‘……a mystery involving pirates’ treasure, lust, and greed. Cait unravels the locked-tower mystery using her eidetic memory and her powers of deduction, which are worthy of Hercule Poirot…’ which thrilled me no end!

Here’s the back-cover blurb: Welsh Canadian globetrotting sleuth, and professor of criminal psychology, Cait Morgan, is supposed to be “celebrating” her fiftieth birthday in Jamaica with her ex-cop husband Bud Anderson. But when the body of the luxury estate’s owner is discovered locked inside an inaccessible tower, Cait and her fellow guests must work out who might have killed him – even if his murder seems impossible. Could the death of the man who hosted parties in the 1960s attended by Ian Fleming and Noël Coward be somehow linked to treasure the legendary Captain Henry Morgan might have buried at the estate? Or to the mission Bud and his secret service colleagues have been sent to the island to undertake?

What’s coming next…

The Corpse With The Iron Will, due to be published in May 2021. There’s no back-cover blurb yet (!!) but this time Cait and Bud find their next-door neighbour dead – so, whilst it is absolutely NOT a pandemic book, it does allow me to consider how a globe-trotting sleuth might feel about a murder/murders so close to home…and all of us have reassessed our perspectives of what ‘home’ means to us over the last year, I believe. Besides, I have to keep reminding myself that, as an author who’s enticed readers with the promise of armchair travel as well as a classic, closed-circle, puzzle-plot mystery to solve, I (and Cait!) live in an area many would like to travel to…the pristine wilderness of beautiful British Columbia, a rain forest with fascinating flora, fauna, foods, history, and art. If you want to be updated about my progress please follow me on
Facebook, here: https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ace-Author-318388861616661 or
Twitter, here: @AceCathy





Cathy Ace’s Welsh Canadian criminal psychologist sleuth Cait Morgan encounters traditional, closed-circle whodunits around the world, while her WISE Enquiries Agency Mysteries feature a quartet of soft-boiled female PIs who solve more cozy cases from their office at a Welsh stately home. Her standalone suspense novel, The Wrong Boy, has been optioned for TV (as have her Cait Morgan Mysteries). Shortlisted for Canada’s Bony Blithe Award three times in four years, winning in 2015, she’s also won IPPY and IBA Awards, and has been shortlisted for an Arthur Ellis Award. Cathy lives in Canada, having migrated from Wales aged 40.




Thank you Cathy. The Wrong Boy was the first of Cathy’s books that I read and knowing the area in which it is set, I found it very evocative not just of the place, but the people too.

Tomorrow, we meet Evonne Wareham.

Chris Lloyd

Chris Lloyd talks about his need to write, his process and Occupation

When did you start writing, and why?

I really can’t remember a time when I didn’t write. At school, I’d write long stories instead of getting on with my homework, which often got me into trouble with my teachers. I think I wrote because it was an escape from a routine, from the everyday. They were worlds and people I could make up, even if I never really had any control over them, and I also think that writing created a degree of confidence in myself that I never felt in real life.

I was also lucky in that my mum was a booklover and always encouraged me to read. When I was about ten, she gave me a copy of ‘The Silver Sword’ by Ian Serraillier, and I always think it was that precise moment that I knew it was what I had to do. Later, it would be my dad who encouraged me to write, telling me he’d read whatever I wrote.

My local library also has to take some of the blame. When I was growing up, it had a rule for children that said for every fiction book you borrowed, you had to borrow one non-fiction book. It was a wonderful idea, even if it might not have seemed it at the time, and it nurtured in me not just a love of reading, but a fascination with broad swathes of knowledge. Even as a kid, it just seemed that the obvious next step for me was to write my own stories. So when I was in my first year at secondary school, I plucked up the nerve to tell another kid in my class that I wanted to be a writer. He just looked at me solemnly and told me I had to wait until I was old enough. I’m still waiting for that to happen, but I’m also still writing.

What motivates you to write?

I think it’s a need to write. There are things I want to say and it just feels that stories are the most effective way of saying them and of getting people to read them. I think that’s why I love the crime genre, as it allows you to explore pretty much any subject you want and present its lighter and darker sides, and then end by offering some sort of resolution, which real life rarely gives.

There’s also nothing quite like the thrill of creating characters and worlds. The whole process of writing fiction is deeply enthralling, from the spark of an idea that wakes you up in the middle of the night to the research that throws up surprising nuggets sending your story dancing off in a whole new direction. And then there’s the blank screen staring back at you and the tentative first words, the first draft and (and this will be unpopular) the rewrites. I complain and swear at every single part of it, but I could never live without it.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones?  If you write both, what do you find the difference?

Every time I try to write a short story, my immediate thought is that it’s too limiting, that I’d like to pursue the idea further and turn it into a novel instead. And the same pretty much goes for series versus standalones. I get involved with the characters and the worlds and I immediately know the moment I start planning that I want to carry on living with them and see how their stories develop across other books. The other great thing about series is that I know the characters, so there isn’t the need to discover a whole cast of new ones every time I start writing. It feels like getting old friends to help write the story with me. And I find that there’s always something in one of the character’s stories or personalities that I want to come back to in a later book.

Having said that, there are a couple of ideas I’ve got for standalones that I really want to make the time to explore. Well, I say standalones. That can always change…

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

That would have to be Eddie Giral, who’s the main character in my latest book, The Unwanted Dead. Eddie’s a police detective in Occupied Paris, fighting his own battle to try and do his job properly under the Nazi regime. I love writing about him, both because he’s a very complex character and because the stories are in the first-person, which really lets me get inside his mind (and him inside mine!). He tries to be a good man in bad times, but he’s fundamentally flawed – he’s human and fallible, his moral compass can go badly wrong and the choices he’s made in his life haven’t always been the most palatable, to the point of being self-destructive. So much of the stories are about Eddie’s struggle to retain (or regain) some semblance of humanity while walking a tightrope between the occupier and the occupied and between resistance and collaboration, and he doesn’t always get it right. And still I love him.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

There’s a character in The Unwanted Dead who makes my blood boil. His name is Hauptmann Karl Weber and he’s an officer in the Wehrmacht. I’ve tried to be realistic with the characters in the story in that not all the Occupiers are essentially bad people and not all the Occupied are essentially good people – they were individuals caught up in the politics of the time – but Weber has a sense of entitlement that cuts through to the bone. He’s supercilious and arrogant and every jobsworth and self-appointed elite that any of us has ever had to put up with.

Tell us about your last book…

The Unwanted Dead begins on the day the Nazis march into Paris. Four refugees have been found gassed in a railway truck. Later that day, a fifth man commits suicide. Despite opposition from the occupiers and reluctance and apathy from the rest of his police colleagues, Eddie becomes obsessed with finding the truth. On a continent where thousands are dying every day, the four murders in the railway yard come to mean everything to Eddie, a redemption for the mistakes he’s made in his own life. His investigation, though, will lead him to suspect a far greater crime, one that he refuses to believe possible and that will bring him into the gunsights of the Nazis.

What’s coming next…

I’m working with my editor on the edits of the second book in the Eddie Giral series – no title yet – which involves prisoners going missing from one of Paris’s biggest prisons and a plea for help from someone from Eddie’s past. I’m also starting to research and plot Eddie’s third outing, which takes place at Christmas 1940, when the complexion of the Occupation was beginning to change for the worse.

Anything else you want to share?

I’m a member of the Crime Cymru collective of crime writers and very much looking forward to our Gŵyl Crime Cymru Festival. It’s the first international crime fiction festival in Wales and will be online this year (26 April – 2 May) and in Aberystwyth in 2022 (30 April – 2 May).




Originally from near Cardiff, Chris Lloyd lived in Catalonia for twenty-four years, where he taught English and worked in educational publishing and as a travel writer and translator. He has also lived in Grenoble – researching the French Resistance movement – as well as in the Basque Country and Madrid. He now lives in South Wales and is a writer and translator.

He writes the Eddie Giral series (Orion) set in Occupied Paris. He is also the author of the Elisenda Domènech crime series (Canelo), featuring a police officer with the Catalan police force


Where to find Chris Lloyd:
Website: https://chrislloydauthor.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/chrislloydbcn
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chrislloydbcn/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chris_lloyd_author/
Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Chris-Lloyd/e/B01GQH7Q5C/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1


Thanks Chris, like you I can’t remember a time when I didn’t want to write, fantastic isn’t it?

Tomorrow, we’ll met Cathy Ace

Graham Smith

Today Graham Smith joins us to talk about his writing and the various guises of his good guys.

What motivates you to write?

I’m motivated to write by the urge to tell my own stories. Although I plot them out in advance I always leave some latitude for developments brought about by the writing process. I just love the whole creative process, from the planning to the plotting out, but most of all I love the thrill of throwing down a first draft and seeing the story I’ve plotted out taking a real shape and form.

Which do you like to write, series or standalones?  If you write both, what do you find the difference?

I enjoy writing a series because I find that I grow fond of my characters, but I have written a standalone that’s with my agent and I found it a very liberating experience to write knowing that the entire story arc is contained in a single novel and that I didn’t have to create plot lines and relationships to be picked up in future novels in the series.

Is there anything you wouldn’t write about?

There are several things I wouldn’t write about. The main ones being genres outside crime and thriller fiction as I don’t read those genres so wouldn’t know how to write in them. When it comes to crime and thrillers, I stay away from horrible topics like child abuse and while I have a wonderful idea for a terrorist plot, I could never write it as I couldn’t bear the idea of it ever falling into the hands of someone callous enough to use it.

Who is your favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

My favourite character changes very much depending on which series I’m working on. As I’m currently writing novels, under the pseudonym of John Ryder, featuring Grant Fletcher, I’d have to say he’s the man of the moment, but if I ever went back to write about Harry Evans, Jake Boulder or Beth Young, then they’d be my pick. Fletcher has his own logical way of seeing the world and he’s a man of action who I can easily put into fights both fist and gun, have doing the improbable and yet still show his battle logic as he’s dodging bullets. He appears in First Shot, Final Second and Third Kill.

Who is your least favourite of your characters, why and in which books do they appear?

I don’t tend to have a least favourite character. However, there’s one who stands head and shoulders above all the others as the least likeable. Despite having written about serial killers, murderers and assassins, the character who is the most callous has to be Cameron MacDonald. He’s Jake Boulder’s biological father and appears in Past Echoes. He doesn’t kill anyone, nor does he actively set out to cause trouble, but he somehow finds a way to one create disastrous situation after another with his self-centred behaviour and utter lack of morality. Conversely, I have a special place in my heart for him as he was involved in my favourite ever character kill and he was absolutely fantastic to write, as when I was writing him, I just kept thinking “what’s the worst thing he can do here?” and then have him do it to massive effect.

First Shot
Final Second 
Third Kill (pre-order)
Watching the Bodies
The Kindred Killers

Tell us about your last book…

My last book saw Grant Fletcher travel to Wisconsin to investigate the murder of a farmer’s wife. He ends up on the trail of a deadly serial killer who is targeting farmers for reasons unknown

What’s coming next…

My next release is Third Kill. It’s surprisingly the third book in the Grant Fletcher series and he has to apprehend and neutralise a wraithlike killer who is targeting casino owners in Las Vegas. If I can say so myself without coming across as egotistical, I think it’s one of the fastest-paced novels I’ve ever written.

Anything else you want to share?

Just my thanks to Gail for hosting this and all those who’ve taken the time to read it. Without readers, I’m nothing more than a stenographer for the voices in my head.


Graham Smith is a time served joiner who has built bridges, houses, dug drains and slated roofs to make ends meet.
He is an internationally best-selling Kindle author and has six books featuring DI Harry Evans and the Cumbrian Major Crimes Team, and four novels, featuring Utah doorman, Jake Boulder. His ‘Lakes’ series which has three novels featuring DC Beth Young has received much critical acclaim.

Graham also writes as John Ryder, and as John has released, First Shot and Final Second with Third Kill being released in April 2021


Graham can be found at
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/grahamnsmithauthor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/GrahamSmith1972
Website: www.grahamsmithauthor.com

Thanks Graham, like you I have the terrorist plot I could never put on paper, but who doesn’t?

Tomorrow we’ll be hearing from Chris Lloyd